“What’s going on in Venezuela?”

2014_Venezuelan_Protests_(12F)

It seems as if media coverage of the political and social unrest happening in Venezuela popped up overnight. National student-run peaceful protests started just this month, and received global attention on February 12th when three people were killed. The death toll has since been increased to eight (according to BBC), and it doesn’t seem as if the situation is getting better anytime soon.

What’s the issue at hand? The protesters want tighter security, food in their grocery stores, and protection of freedom of speech. They also took to social media to tell their stories and spread the word about the horrors they are currently facing.

But the Venezuelan government seems to want the coverage of these events disappearing as fast as they appeared. The government has issued a “media-blackout” and is limiting the investigations by news sources covering the event.

CNN gave readers an easy-to-understand article addressing the main questions people have about what exactly is going on in Venezuela and why. But a recent BBC article explains that Venezuelan president Nicolas Maduro has “vowed to expel CNN until they rectify their coverage,” and continues by saying that he “won’t accept war propaganda against Venezuela.”

But now that people know about the situation in Venezuela, or at least see something about it on their Facebook and Twitter feeds, I don’t think they will allow this type of censorship. The Caracas Chronicles wrote a piece about the lack of new coverage on international news sites and basically asked media to “step it up.”

To conclude, many are unaware as to what will happen next for the people of Venezuela. Here’s to hoping that we will actually be able to read about it.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s